Alicia Saltina Marie Clark + Joshua Garrett

Featured in our gallery for the month of June is the work of Oklahoma artists Alicia Saltina Marie Clark and Joshua Garrett.

Learn more about these artists at:
http://www.aliciaclarksart.com/
https://www.instagram.com/deadfeather/

Join us Thursday, June 8th th from 6-9pm for the Artist Preview Reception preceding our regularly scheduled 2nd Friday Opening the following night during Live On The Plaza from 6-10pm.

Artist Preview Reception: Thursday, June 8th // 6pm-9pm
LIVE On The Plaza Opening: Friday, June 9th // 6pm-10pm
Exhibit Runs June 8th - July 9th

 

JOSHUA GARRETT  //  ARTIST QUESTIONS

 

What is your medium/process? 

My medium is pretty basic and simple. Oil pastel over acrylic with the occasional spray paint thrown in.

Where are you from?

I was born in Florida. But Edmond Oklahoma is treating me pretty well at the moment.

 

How would you describe your latest body of work? 

My latest body of work is the same body of work I've been working on since around 2012. It's a concept concerning cultural isolation, conflicted spirituality, obsessive consumption and generational genocide.

What inspires you?

I'm inspired by Muscogee Creek/Native American history and language. Symbolism in every day products and how these symbols influence how much and how quickly we consume these products. Freemasonry. Occult practices. The Church and Christianity and how the traditional beliefs of the American Indian have been wiped out or altered generation by generation. My deafness. These things are somewhat influential to one degree or another.

 

How did you get started?

I got started sometime in 2012 making collage type pieces then eventually sticking with oil pastels. Before all of that business I was writing poetry. At least trying to. One day I just picked up a can of spray paint some oil pastels and cut out some models in a magazine then glued them to a piece of board. The process has been going on since then.

What are your goals for the future?

My future goals? Well, I've been kind of feeling the writing bug again. Learning about Muscogee Creek history every now and then gets me pretty hyped up. I can see myself attempting another poetry book concerning the 9 deities of the Muscogee Creek or something of that nature. I can also see myself sculpting in the future. For someone who is self taught, I think sculpting has been very nice to me. And of course painting is in the future. But, I'm no prophet. We'll see.

What advice do you have to artists?

As far as advice for other artists, I don't really have any. I guess I would say go with your instincts. Keep doing what you do if it feels right. And screw any cliques that come your way. Be your own clique. Everyone has their own agenda and 97% of the time it won't involve you. Oh, and meditate and give thanks.. I think that's about it.

ALICIA SALTINA MARIE CLARK  //  ARTIST QUESTIONS

What is your medium/process?  

I love to play with different mediums and see how I can make them work together, but my main mediums for this body of work are acrylic, latex, and charcoal. Sometimes I will go back over the charcoal with a wet brush almost working it like a watercolor, and it seems to bring out more contrast. 

Where are you from? 

I was born in Manassass, Virginia but fully raised in Oklahoma City and Wichita Falls, Texas.

How would you describe your latest body of work? 

I take inspiration from stories told by my ancestors. Such as The Old Lady Who Kept All the Pecans, and The Buffalo Woman told by my Great-great-great Grandfather. I also play with modern elements like pixels. This idea came to me while I was looking at the bead work of some regalia and how it resembles pixels of a computer image. I've also taken embroidery patterns and used them in the back ground of some of the paintings. Embroidery is often on shawls. I like patterns, and bright colors and old photos and enjoy mixing these into a visual that honors my ancestors and an endangered culture. 

What inspires you? 

Life, layers, patterns, colors, people, events.

How did you get started? 

I've been an artist since I was small. In college I played mainly in contemporary ideas with a focus in ceramics and printmaking. Not until about five years ago did I start incorporating the Native American portrait and contemporary ideas. After long spouts of traveling and wondering I've decided to connect back with my roots. 

What are your goals for the future? 

To keep embracing an endangered culture, and shedding light through other endangerment's through my art. My purpose is to have a brush in hand and tell a visual story of emotion.

What advice do you have to artist? 

Keep throwing arrows, express yourself, and make what YOU think is beautiful.